Tag Archives: community

Is your intranet a campaigning tool?

Have you been asked to support a campaign or issue that you feel strongly about?  I don’t mean someone asking you in the same room.  I am talking about finding out using social media like Facebook posts or tweets on Twitter.

Campaign groups like 38 Degrees and Sumofus are very successful in focusing people’s attention on an issue, engaging their support and transforming that into action that is effective in achieving its aim.

The speed with which support can be gained is very impressive.  The method of giving your support is very quick and simple.  The ripple effect from publicising progress gains a momentum of its own.

I am sure we can all think of recent successful campaigns.  Probably most of you have supported a campaign because the issue meant something to you…..

……which got me thinking (I know, that’s a dangerous thing for me to do! )

Would organisations have the courage to use their intranets as a business tool to identify barriers to employee satisfaction and productivity using a version of these tools?

Accepting that factors like communication channels, inclusive culture need to be working well, would tools like this help organisations avoid long-running disputes or make business decisions without being aware of the full picture?

In the UK (still part of the EU!) if an online petition reaches 100,000 signatures it has to be debated by MPs in Parliament and people who signed are updated on its progress and the outcome of the debate. (the latest was whether Trump should visit the UK or not).

So, with my governance hat on I believe this could benefit organisations and add to an intranet’s reputation as the nerve centre with a few simple rules.

  1. Avoid moderation.  Employees want to be trusted to have a free hand in the views they express and the range of support and how to gain it.  Most employees are able to see whether an issue is a genuine or just someone raising a personal gripe.
  2. Set a time limit for the length of the campaign.  You want to identify the burning issues that could quickly cause problems rather than those that will keep chuntering on for ever and are unrealistic.
  3. Set a sign-up threshold for issues to achieve before action is taken.  You could make that an absolute number e.g. 1,000 or a percentage of total employees.  An upper limit could mean that when the top-level of management next meet the issue is given a minimum of time to be raised and a decision to be made.
  4. Give this channel/tool the appropriate prominence and senior management support.  Employees need to realise it is not a gimmick but a serious approach to tap emerging thoughts and issues.

I am sure some of you will think this is unnecessary or even ridiculous and create nothing but problems.

Others may think ‘What is the downside?’ ‘What is there to lose by trialling it and seeing what happens?’.

You decide….!

How can new publishers comply with your intranet standards?

Implementing publishing standards that meet your organisation’s requirements helps create a consistently good experience for people accessing your intranet.

They are critical to you implementing a successful governance framework.  The publishing standards will support your intranet strategy, publishing model, roles and responsibilities.

All your content owners and editors need to comply with the publishing standards.  Knowing this, people will access your intranet and use it more, confident in the integrity of the content and applications and aware that you ensure publishers comply with each standard.

And that can be the weakest link in your governance framework!  How do you continue to provide that consistently good user experience with new publishers?

I am talking about publishing accredited – news articles, company policies, etc. – content, not collaborative – blogs, discussion groups, etc. – in this post.

Your governance framework must cover how you manage new content owners and editors.  This is the best way to sustain the baseline you have established for best practice.  Without it, people will inevitably see a decline when they access your intranet.  Their productivity and effectiveness risks declining and affecting their overall work performance.

There are five actions that you need to consider taking so new publishers are good publishers:

  1. Induction training on how to use the publishing tool.  This is not just about what to use it for.  It includes how to use the publishing templates.  It needs to covers features like global navigation bar, content owner, review and last updated dates.  By explaining why this is important it helps encourage best practice.
  2. Have good communications channels so new publishers can keep up to date with the latest news that affects them.  Publishers should be able to ask other publishers for help and get answers.  New publishers should feel they are fully informed about how they use the intranet.
  3. Offer clear online guidance and best practice tips on how to publish on the intranet.  Reinforce this when you contact content owners and editors e.g. email, discussion group, conference call or webinar.
  4. Invite all new publishers to join a discussion group covering publishing topics to help develop a broader understanding.  It is much easier (and cheaper) to have peer-to-peer conversations where practical tips are shared quickly with each other.
  5. Have one set of publishing templates that you manage.  Keep publishing simple and easy to encourage best practice.  One publishing process will save content owners and editors’ time.  It avoids the temptation to try alternative methods or create more templates.Book cover - Digital success or digital disasters

Find out more information on how to manage your publishing community and intranet from my new book ‘Digital success or digital disaster?‘.  Read the introductory chapter to find out more.  A license to share the ebook with publishers across your organisation is also available.

I wrote a book about governance: ‘Digital success or digital disaster?’

Book cover - Digital success or digital disastersWhen an intranet loses its usefulness over time, and people become disengaged and end up working around it rather than through it, I often find that the strategy and governance have been neglected.

Even a strong and appropriate strategy will founder if the governance isn’t in place to execute it.

I see governance as the foundation of a great intranet, and by ‘great’ I mean an intranet that is useful, useable, and supports the organisation’s goals and people’s needs.

I often blog about intranet governance, but my brand new book offers a lot more than I could ever drip-feed via short posts.  Writing a book has helped crystallise my thinking around governance, and delve deep into my past experience as an intranet manager, and as a consultant.

Take a look at my book now – it’s called ‘Digital success or digital disaster?’ and I mean for it to be relevant to intranets, collaboration, digital workplace and mobile workspace governance, while focussing on intranets.

I’m so pleased to have it published through Intranätverk, it’s been great to work with Kristian Norling and his team.  Seeing the final book on my tablet has made the months of writing all worth the effort.  I’m thrilled to be able to offer you my experience, guidance, and tips and hope you’ll consider my book a toolkit to better governance and a better intranet.

Please take a look at what the book offers you and your organisation – this is a ‘business book’ that should help organisations of every size, but I also hope it’s of interest to individual practitioners and ‘lone intranet managers’. I think this book can support you.

* Digital success or digital disaster? – Book available now.

* Follow me on Twitter – let me know what you think!

Building an intranet publishing community

I recently posted about ‘5 simple ways to have good intranet publishers’ which James Robertson publicised on his blog and added the comment “All good stuff! I like to see a strong authoring community on this list, but that is probably difficult in an organisation the size of BT”.

So, grateful for any encouragement, especially from someone like James, I’m trying to show what we have done and will be doing in BT.

As BT’s intranet has grown so has the number of people publishing.  The method of publishing and the management of content but the leadership has consistently been with communications in BT.

As the BT Intranet manager, I lead a small team in communications responsible for the strategy, standards, compliance and development of our intranet that meets the business, user and publishers needs.

We communicate to key stakeholders the strategy and action plans so we have their commitment for funding of key developments that improve our intranet and awareness, hopefully understanding too, when needed.

We have a decentralised publishing model.  Each of our 6 lines of business has a key contact who engages with my team on operational needs and extends the implementation of our action plan and strategy.

Someone responsible for information is also responsible for publishing and managing it on our intranet.  They have training, standards and tools to check compliance.  They review their own content and respond to any user feedback.  The owner’s name is on every page they own so users know who to contact with any queries.

Line managers approve or reject publishing requests.  Soon if our new automated intranet management tool identifies content that doesn’t comply with key standards e.g. content out of date or not accessible, line managers of content owners will need to act or the offending content will be removed if no action taken by the owner.

I’m talking about formal, content management published, type content here that is authoritative and factual.  It is different for user generated content like wikis and blogs which are rightly managed with a much lighter touch.

Previously we had Frontpage discussion groups and newsgroups when we had a smaller number of publishers who helped each other by sharing problems with each other.

As the numbers have increased – potentially everyone in BT is a user and publisher of content now – so the technical skill level has dropped and the time to devote to helping others.

Now we use BTpedia, our corporate wiki, to share any publishing issues.  While people may have less time to devote to helping others than before, there are far more who can.  We hope one will balance out the other.  Time will tell!